Sparkling wines start to give top champagnes a run

Sparkling wines start to give top champagnes a run , Climate change offers sparkling prospects to English winemakers . With climate change pushing up temperatures,

Strolling through the Pinglestone vineyard in Hampshire, southern England, under a pale autumn sun, winemaker James Bowerman is smiling broadly. This year’s temperatures have taken Vranken-Pommery, the prominent French champagne house that bought the estate in 2014, by surprise.This year’s temperatures have taken Vranken-Pommery, the prominent French champagne house that bought the estate in 2014, by surprise.Intrigued by the rapid growth of vineyards in England, Vranken-Pommery jumped into the market after falling in love with the chalk hills of Hampshire.

Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier account for 71.2 per cent of the grape varieties planted. “We can have wines which are fine and expressive but with a nice style and freshness,” Pierlot said.

Sparkling wine ‘niche’

While English vintners have made sparkling wines for decades, the number of hectares given over to their production has soared 150 percent in the last 10 years, tripling since 2000.said Mr Chris Foss, head of the wine department at Plumpton College, Britain’s centre for excellence in viniculture.English vineyards have found their “niche” with sparkling wines, and now produce “delicious” bottles,

Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier account for 71.2 percent of the grape varieties planted.”Thirty years ago, it was impossible to ripen the Chardonnay grapes. The wines were green, hard and very acidic. It didn’t work. But now there’s no problem,” he said.Besides Vranken-Pommery, France’s venerable Taittinger champagne house has set up in Kent, just across the Channel in south-east England.

She is also the first woman to have won the prestigious award.

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